In Bloom Now

This is a very busy month of the year for me so I’ve not posted in a while, but I’ve got some great things blooming now:


This is a streptocarpus hybrid called ‘blue Ice’—These plants belong to the same family as African violets, gesneriads— These are easy to propagate and I grew this one from a single leaf—I give it early morning sun and bright, indirect light the rest of the day—It is allowed to dry out between watering, but I don’t let it stay dry for extended periods of time—

Fall is when Oncidium Sharry Baby ‘Sweet fragrance’ blooms, above and below—It has one of my favorite orchid scents—I am always delighted when it blooms—


The marvelous thing about Oncidium Sharry Baby ‘Sweet Fragrance’ is that the cultivar name is spot-on with regards to the delicious Almond-Joy scent of the flowers—It has a ‘Sweet fragrance’ indeed—Speaking of spots, I keep this oncidium outside in the warm months, and rains splash the leaves, causing the spotting which is common for this hybrid—

Both Griffinia bulbs bloomed for the second time this year—I had forgotten about these photos, which are from just before the move to the new house—These are two different species, one is Liboniana, the other possibly Espiritensis or an unknown hybrid with espiritensis in the mix—I put too much perlite in the potting mix for these Brazilian jungle plants, and so I water them frequently: every other day in summer—But, they seem content—These diminutive relatives of the hippeastrum are every bit as alluring as their larger cousins—

Six weeks ago I was treated to an explosion of bright, tiny blooms from this Bulbophyllum sessile, below—

Rather than a stem, the blooms are massed along a trailing rhizome, from which the leaves with their tiny pseudobulbs grow—



The leaves of Bulbophyllum sessile are about an inch long, and the spiky, cream and orange flowers are about a quarter of an inch—It has a delightful fragrance: a sweet, slightly musky scent—B. sessile is easy to grow and forgiving of light neglect—Very bright indirect light and a daily watering in summer, ever few days in the cooler months of the year—

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In bloom Now

This is a very busy month of the year for me so I’ve not posted in a while, but I’ve got some great things blooming now:


This is a streptocarpus hybrid called ‘blue Ice’—These plants belong to the same family as African violets, gesneriads— These are easy to propagate and I grew this one from a single leaf—I give it early morning sun and bright, indirect light the rest of the day—It is allowed to dry out between watering, but I don’t let it stay dry for extended periods of time—

Fall is when Oncidium Sharry Baby ‘Sweet fragrance’ blooms, above and below—It has one of my favorite orchid scents—I am always delighted when it blooms—


The marvelous thing about Oncidium Sharry Baby ‘Sweet Fragrance’ is that the cultivar name is spot-on with regards to the delicious Almond-Joy scent of the flowers—It has a ‘Sweet fragrance’ indeed—Speaking of spots, I keep this oncidium outside in the warm months, and rains splash the leaves, causing the spotting which is common for this hybrid—

Both Griffinia bulbs bloomed for the second time this year—I had forgotten about these photos, which are from just before the move to the new house—These are two different species, one is Liboniana, the other possibly Espiritensis or an unknown hybrid with espiritensis in the mix—I put too much perlite in the potting mix for these Brazilian jungle plants, and so I water them frequently: every other day in summer—But, they seem content—These diminutive relatives of the hippeastrum are every bit as alluring as their larger cousins—

Six weeks ago I was treated to an explosion of bright, tiny blooms from this Bulbophyllum sessile, below—

Rather than a stem, the blooms are massed along a trailing rhizome, from which the leaves with their tiny pseudobulbs grow—



The leaves of Bulbophyllum sessile are about an inch long, and the spiky, cream and orange flowers are about a quarter of an inch—It has a delightful fragrance: a sweet, slightly musky scent—B. sessile is easy to grow and forgiving of light neglect—Very bright indirect light and a daily watering in summer, ever few days in the cooler months of the year—

Blooming Now

The blooms on this cattleya hybrid have been open for a few weeks now, my first blooming of this one–I had buds on one pseudobulb earlier this year, but they failed to mature–This one is called Slc. Love Castle ‘Kurenai’–Great saturated color, I especially like the dark smudge of orange in the lip–The flowers in this almost miniature hybrid (the psedobulbs and leaves are about about 12 inches) have a light, delicate fragrance and are 3 1/2″ across–


Hovering above begonia leaves are the two flowers of Miltassia Dark Star ‘Darth Vader’–You’ve got to love the name of this guy–The substantial lip on this miltonia/brassia hybrid is almost the same color as the flowers of Slc. Love Castle–I have not detected a scent–These blooms are around three inches, I only got two; he is a shy bloomer for me–

Blc. Karen’s Sunrise ‘Lakeview’ in bloom

It’s been a while since I’ve posted due to moving, work, life in general–Good, but time-consuming things–I continue to take pictures of everything blooming and so in the next week I’ll be catching up with more on those–And also an update on the seedling amaryllis bulbs, the Venus flytraps and other projects–

Today I am excited to write a post about this Brassolaeliocattleya I bought last year at the Atlanta orchid society show–I love the name: Blc. Karen’s Sunrise ‘Lakeview’–


I wasn’t aware it had buds until recently, and since this is a first blooming for me, I’ve been watching it closely as they went through the final stages of development–There were three, but it looked like one had blasted early on–


I am delighted with these two flowers, each about five inches across–I’ve mentioned before that I have a particular weakness for green cattleyas–It think it’s because the first orchid I fell in love with as a young teen was a Brassavola digbyana– (now reclassified as Rhyncholealia digbyana)–It epitomized the mysterious, exotic nature of orchids in my imaginative young mind–While not a cattleya, it had the same flower shape, and is green–No doubt there is B. digbyana somewhere in the genetic makeup of this flower given the color and certainly, the hybrid classification Blc.–

 

This one, however, will not stay this lovely chartreuse, but will grow lighter and more intense in color over the next few days until it is a bright lemon yellow–The delightful fragrance has not developed as of yet either–This gradual, almost secretive flower development is another something special about cattleyas and some other orchids–It’s neat to watch the petals flatten and grow, the colors change, and find that the smell has quietly appeared one day, a delight–


The yellow tones are more noticeable in the above photo with the late-afternoon sun peeking through a nearby crepe myrtle–I will post an update on these blooms in a few days once they’ve matured– 

Like many modern cattleya hybrids, Blc. Karen’s Sunrise ‘Lakeview’ is an easy One to grow, lots of early morning or late afternoon sun, midday shade and watering whenever very dry–

Laeliocattleya Star Parade ‘Volcano Queen’

I’ve been quite busy lately and haven’t had a chance to do a post on this orchid–The one flower it put out is starting to show signs of fading, so here it is:


I got this mini cattleya a few years ago as a division; I love the splashes of vibrant yellow and purple on the lip–The flower doesn’t have perfect form, but it’s still pleasing–


‘Volcano Queen’ has pseudobulbs and leaves that are only about 10 inches, making this hybrid perfect for anyone who doesn’t have a lot of room–One issue: I am concerned about the color break on the left petal–This could be a sign of a virus, an environmental issue or insect damage–Until I can test it, I’ll have to be careful to keep this one in an area away from the rest of the orchids–

Brassavola Nodosa in Bloom

This Brassavola nodosa has just come into bloom:


It only produced two flowers on one spike this year–Still, considering that it didn’t bloom at all last year, I’ll take them–


The leaves of this plant are described as terete, meaning cylindrical and tapering–This orchid species is not a fast grower for me, putting on an average of two to three leaves a year, unlike some hybrids of B. nodosa that produce many new leads and pseudobulbs each year, like Brassocatleya Ladybird–


The flowers of B. nodosa are only fragrant at night, and what a fragrance it is–Like the moonflower and many other night-scented flowers, the scent of this orchid is a rich , slightly powdery floral with a citrus edge–In fact, these spidery white blooms reminded me of the moonflowers I grew last year when I first inhaled their scent a few nights ago–I prize fragrance above all in flowers, and this orchid does not disappoint–Speaking of moonflowers, I have several growing from seed I collected last year, not yet old enough to bloom–Later in the summer I’ll post pics when they do–


I have a fondness for orchids that are green, or green and white–They seem more mysterious and exotic–I also love how particularly satisfying it is to stand on a darkened porch and inhale this delicious fragrance, unencumbered by visual or audio stimuli, just falling into the scent–

Brassavola nodosa is found from Mexico and Central America to parts of South America–Where mine sits he gets a few hours of direct early morning sun and several hours of late evening sun, with bright shade during the hottest parts of the day–I water when dry, making sure to let the medium dry out again before the next watering, as with cattleyas; this guy is in a small pot, so it averages about 3 times a week in summer–This is a rewarding orchid to grow, and I have several other Brassavola species on my list of desired plants– 

Bratonia Shelob ‘Tolkien’ in Bloom

I took a video of this fantastic orchid, a cross between a Brassia and a Miltonia, hence the name:


This guy has multiple spikes this year; the spidery flowers are beautifully spotted and spiky and make quite a visual impression en masse–Theme Shelob comes from J.R.R. Tolkien’s evil spider creature from his Middle Earth series of novels–


I have Bratonia Shelob ‘Tolkien’ potted in a mixture af 70% bark and 30% spagnum moss–I give him early morning sun and bright shade the rest of the day–In the summer he gets watered twice a week–This is a rewarding and easy to grow orchid, perfect for beginners–


A closeup of the fantastic lip–What A marvelous hybrid this is!–

Euchile Mariae in Bloom

This is one of my favorite orchids, Euchile mariae, previously known as Prosthechea mariae–It hails from mountains in northwest Mexico–


These flowers carry no scent that I can detect; their allure lies in the juxtaposition of two unassuming colors, the green sepals and petals gracefully fanned out above the voluptuous, white-skirt lip–


Euchile mariae is not particularly notable foliage-wise when out of bloom–That may change as the plant continues to grow and add pseudo bulbs since the foliage has a cool, glaucous sheen–This year it put out three spikes, and if the last two buds continue to develop properly, I’ll have 7 blooms–Here you can see five open on two spikes–


Two blooms on the second spike–I grow this orchid no different than my cattleyas: warm with bright light, drying between waterings–

Dendrobium Loddigesii

I’m behind on posts, so now that I am on vacation I have time to sort through photos from the last 5 months and post them–This is Dendrobium loddigesii from April:

Deciduous cane dendrobiums are my favorite kind–This little guy, a miniature Asian species, was the first one I acquired–

I grow this orchid on a small piece of oak–The brightly-colored flowers are about 2.5 inches across, and lightly fragrant–

I water Dendrobium loddigesii daily in the warm months, and give it a winter rest from November to February with little to no watering–It makes keikis (baby plantlets) like crazy–


The beautiful fringed flowers, above–Bright light with morning or late day sun is best for this dendrobium–This is an easy and rewarding orchid to grow–